Tennessee Preservation Trust

Ten in Tennessee: 2013 Ten in Tenn

The Tennessee Preservation Trust held a press conference on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 2:30pm in the Old Supreme Court Chambers at the Tennessee State Capitol and announced the selected properties for its 2013 Ten in Tennessee Endangered Properties List. This years list includes properties in Sumner, Sevier, Robertson, Hamilton, Davidson, Morgan, Shelby, Marshall, McMinn and Bedford Counties.

Cordell Hull (Davidson)

Importance:

The Cordell Hull Building was constructed in 1952-53 and is named for Tennessee statesman, Cordell Hull. The building is one of several limestone buildings that frame the State Capitol. It is one of the best examples of mid-century modern architecture in the state.

Status:

Current Threat: State officials have expressed an interest in razing the building citing that the expense of rehab outweighs demolition.

19th Century Club (Shelby)

Importance:

The 19th Century Club began as a private home completed in 1909 by lumberman Rowland Darnell. It was one of many fine mansions that line the street, now it is the only one. The property has been owned by the 19th Century Club for the last 85 years.

Status:

Current Threat: Sale of the property and potential demolition of site.

Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts (Sevier)

Importance:

The Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts dates back to 1912 when the i Beta Phi women’s fraternity established a nearby settlement school. The settlement school focused mostly on traditional education courses, but quickly expanded to include mountain handicrafts to help preserve the artisan legacy of the residents and to provide a source of revenue for locals. The Arrowmont campus includes two National Register districts.

Status:

Current Threats: Arrowmont owns only a few buildings and leases the rest from Phi Beta Phi which sold the property in December of 2012.

Hutchison House (Robertson)

Importance:

The large white frame Neo-Classical, columned house was built in 1904 by John Young and Laura F. Hutchison. The house is one of the initial houses built on the block from which the rest of the neighborhood was carved. The Hutchisons sold the house in 1911 and only three residents have owned the house since. The house has had only a few structural or architectural modifications over the years.

Status:

Current Threats: Foreclosure, neglect, water damage and the property has been condemned by the City of Springfield Codes.

Kellytown Archaeological Site (40WM10) (Davidson)

Importance:

The Kellytown Archaeological Site represents a major Mississippian period Native American town established on a high terrace overlooking the Little Harpeth River. It dates to roughly 1400-1500 A.D. The site includes human graves, two separate palisade lines with bastions, domestic and probable public structures, and refuse-filled pits. The site is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

Status:

Current Threat: Commercial development of the site.

Delta Queen (Hamilton)

Importance:

The Delta Queen is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Fabricated in 1927, the Delta Queen was assembled in California with internal machinery from Scotland and the paddlewheel shaft and cranks from Germany. It navigated the rivers of California know as the “delta route” until 1940. The Delta Queen was used by the US Navy during WWII as a receiving ship for naval reservists from 1940-1941. After Pearl Harbor, the boat was commissioned into naval services and became emergency hospital transport and remained in military service until 1946. Captain Tom Greene purchased the Delta Queen from the US Way Shipping Administration in 1946 for the Greene Line Steamers of Cincinnati. The vessel was piloted down the Pacific Coast, through the Panama Canal, across 5,000 miles of the Gulf of Mexico, up the Mississippi River and down the Ohio to where it began its long stay navigating the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers while docking in Cincinnati from 1948 until 2008. Its status changed when the US Congress included the boat under the boat under the Safety of Life at Sea Law in 2008. The boat ended up in Chattanooga and currently serves as a floating hotel and restaurant.

Status:

Current Threats: Permanent mooring of the vessel, no shared history with the City of Chattanooga and difficulty paying the monthly rent.

Moye-Green Boarding House (Sumner)

Importance:

The Moye-Green Boarding House is one of the earliest residential properties in Portland. It is located along the historical L&N Railroad. The property operated as a boarding house from c. 1890-c.1945. The architecture is an example of the Cumberland plan house and the I-House beginning in 1878 as a two room, single story Cumberland House. The dwelling evolved in 1882 to include a central hall, I-House. The house is an excellent example of a late 19th century dwelling featuring decorative Folk Victorian detailing on the exterior porches, a common embellishment seen on vernacular architecture.

Status:

Current Threats: Vandalism, deterioration due to the natural elements, natural decay of the wood.

St. George Hotel (Hamilton)

Importance:

Constructed in 1924 across from one of the South’s largest and busiest passenger train terminals, the Chattanooga Choo-Choo, the St. George was one of the city’s most active and vibrant hotels. Its art deco architecture was different for Chattanooga at the time, reflecting a national architectural trend that was popular in the 1920s. It was built as one of the first “fire proof” hotels in the city.

Status:

Current Threats: Neglect, deterioration, forced foreclosure and the potential for inappropriate development.

Stonecipher-Kelly-McCartt House (Morgan)

Importance:

In 1814 Ezra B. Stonecipher constructed an unusually large, two story log home with an additional, third level loft on a portion of the land adjacent to an area known today as Frozen Head State Park. The Saddlebag style is unusual for the region, and the house retains most of its original, character defining architectural features. In February 2013 the house and property was presented to the State Land Acquisition Commission for review as a potential addition to the Frozen Head State Park.

Status:

Current Threat: The State Commission was receptive to the addition to the park but the property will be scored against other state projects.

Churches/Spiritual Places (Statewide)

Importance:

The four properties listed for the Churches and Sacred Places are Water Street Abbey in Marshall County, Frierson’s Chapel in Robertson County, First United Presbyterian Church in McMinn County and Bell Buckle First Baptist Church in Bedford County. The properties are significant for their architectural styles and their impact on the historical culture of the communities where they are located.

Status:

Current Threats: Demolition by neglect, expansion of existing facilities and inappropriate development.